So you're going on an interview? Questions to ask

Crabcake Johnny

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Maryland
A lot of the emails I get involve new agents about to go on an interview and hoping they don't end up getting screwed. Here's questions to ask and warning signs before you sign on with any agency:

1) Is their any upfront fees for this job? If there is, run - don't walk - to your nearest exit. Saying you have to use the bathroom and diving into your car will work. NEVER pay for a job!

2) Is it a group interview? Not a great sign. That means it's a sales presenation, not an interview.

3) Are you actually being interviewed? Is the manager going over your resume and asking questions about your past jobs and goals? If not, start to get worried.

4) Are you provided with leads? If so, are they fresh and exclusive?

5) Ask if you can ride along with one of the top reps so you can see their presentation. Top reps who are ethical are proud of their accomplishments and will allow that. Unethical top reps won't allow you to come along - they don't want you to see their slimy presentation. Usually the excuse is that it's harder to close the deal. That's BS.

6) Can you take all the product brochures home to review? Can they compare their products, rates and commissions with their competitors? Companies that offer a fair deal will always compare. Companies that won't allow you to compare will end the interview.

7) How are chargebacks handled? Is there any interested charged on the advance or debt? If so, what's the yearly interest?

8) Can you outline a typical week for me where I can make "X" amount of dollars? I wake up and do what?

9) Will I be provided with enough leads to make "X" amount? If not, how many leads will I have to generate on my own and how will I generate those leads?

10) Do I own my own book of business?
 
Good questions.

I recently suggested the ride along to gentleman on other forum as you stated the managers response to that will be all telling. Then of course the experience will be extremely informative.

Also-

Expense's? Whats covered?

Some companies will provide you a laptop......for a monthly fee of course!

Have manager give detail breakdown as nothing like getting hired to find out your E&O will be 5x's the amount it would cost on the open market.

Ask the manager how they are paid?

Do they sell and if so do they have a quota? Not a good sign because you can bet your ass he/she is looking out for #1.

Understand exactly how you will be paid. This sounds simple but have been on interviews where it was like pulling teeth to get.

What is average tenure of the current sales team?

How long has the interviewing manager been there?

How many of the current sales team did he/she hire?


Remember your interviewing them as much as they are you.

I interviewed with Merrill before taking current position and the manager stated that he felt like he was "interrogated".
That same manager offered me the job in only 2 interviews where company standard was a whole barrage of interviews and test. His exact words - "your no nonsense"

Point- ask questions and do research.
Research is important as you don't want to ask questions that any dummy with internet could look up. Also that research will save you from going on alot of worthless interviews.

Your the only one to blame if you walk into a job with your eyes closed.
 
to bad you will not get an honest answer on your questions......I just asume that all marketing companys are lying to me ............
 
Aye, but thats where the research come into play.

With the internet at everyones disposal no excuse not to "google" the company your thinking about interviewing with.
 
Another point worth noting is that there is usually an inverse relationship between how much money the interviewer tells you that you can make your first year and how much you can actually make.

If you're told you'll make six figures easily, you'll be lucky to break even. Run and don't look back. If you're told that first year agents usually make 35-40K, you'll probably make at least that.
 
Not a ? but a thought-

If your state allows you to take class/test without a sponsor do it. Will help in interviews with reputable companies. The manager will at least know your serious and able to pass test.

The "clown" companies could care less as most don't pay for class or test. They will wait for you for months to take class/test. They need to fill seats.
 
Another point worth noting is that there is usually an inverse relationship between how much money the interviewer tells you that you can make your first year and how much you can actually make.

If you're told you'll make six figures easily, you'll be lucky to break even. Run and don't look back. If you're told that first year agents usually make 35-40K, you'll probably make at least that.

I think this statement is spot on. When they are trying to "sell" you the job, and saying how you should be able to do 6 figures your first year, you need to take a skeptical view. The company I am most impressed with is one that hands you a copy of the payout schedule and then breaks it down to "average, below average, and above average."
 
I think this statement is spot on. When they are trying to "sell" you the job, and saying how you should be able to do 6 figures your first year, you need to take a skeptical view. The company I am most impressed with is one that hands you a copy of the payout schedule and then breaks it down to "average, below average, and above average."

Hi,

I agreed with you. Any way, your ideal make me thinking about some thing for my project.

Please try to keep posting. Tks and best regards
 
The first insurance company I went to work for just had one test to determine whether they hired someone.

It went something like this...

"Let us see if you have a pulse... Yep!... You're hired!"
 
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